Safflower Carthamus tinctorius

Safflower production goes back anciently, including during the time of the Egyptians. Garlands were discovered in Tutankhamun’s tomb. Safflowers were also used as a coloring agent. The colors produced range from yellow to dark red, and safflower petals are still used for this purpose today in cosmetics and textiles. At times, petals have been used as an inexpensive but lacking substitute for saffron.  

Safflower has traditional medicinal uses, such as for treating high cholesterol levels, improving heart health, and managing diabetes.  Today research continues in finding useful medicinal applications.  

Today’s safflower production also includes the seeds for oil production and the by-products for soap and livestock feed. The oils are high in oleic acid and are found in margarine and salad oils. Another component of the oil is linoleic acid, which is useful for high temperature cooking and for industrial paints and stains.

For more information: www.healthbenefitstimes.com/health-benefits-of-safflower-seeds-oil/


Safflower Mayonnaise

Keyword: safflower
Author: Reni Erskine

Ingredients

  • 1 egg
  • 1 t apple cider vinegar
  • 2 t lemon or lime juice
  • 1 t Dijon mustard
  • ½ t salt
  • ¼ t Penzey’s Ancho Pepper spice or add to taste
  • ¼ c olive oil
  • 1 ¼ c safflower oil

Instructions

  • Use your blender to whip up this easy recipe by combining the first 7 ingredients.
  • Then slowly add the safflower oil until your mayo forms.
  • Enjoy the smoky south of the border taste with a slight touch of heat.

Notes

Memphis Herb Society
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